The Franklin D. Roosevelt  Presidential Library and Museum will present “Eleanor Everywhere”

A Women’s History Month 
author talk and book signing
with Sandra Opdycke author of
THE ROUTLEDGE HISTORICAL 
ATLAS OF WOMEN IN AMERICA
Wednesday, March 21, 2018 at 4:00 p.m.
Henry A. Wallace Center at the
FDR Presidential Library and Home
CLICK HERE to register
HYDE PARK, NY — The Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum will present “Eleanor Everywhere” a Women’s History Month author talk and book signing with Sandra Opdycke author of THE ROUTLEDGE HISTORICAL ATLAS OF WOMEN IN AMERICA on Wednesday, March 21, 2018. The program will begin at 4:00 p.m. in Henry A. Wallace Center at the FDR Presidential Library and Home. Following the presentation, Opdycke will be available to sign copies of her book.
 
This is a free public event but registration is required. Visit www.fdrlibrary.org or CLICK HERE to register.
Eleanor Roosevelt invented a new way to be First Lady. During her White House years she spoke out regularly on public issues. She based her comments on what she learned from her vast correspondence, her huge network of personal contacts, and especially from her extensive travels around the country. Besides accompanying her husband on his occasional campaign trips, Mrs. Roosevelt traveled constantly on her own, often covering more than 40,000 miles a year.
One typical 12-hour day in 1936 involved traveling many miles by car, giving several speeches, and visiting a school, a chicken farm, a tearoom, a craft shop, several dozen new low-cost homes, and a vacuum-cleaner assembly plant. Such trips were neither leisurely nor scenic, but because of the way that Eleanor Roosevelt looked at people and the way she listened to them, she was able to see what was unique and human in each place she visited. As a result, her travels accomplished two important things: first, she made the New Deal a vivid presence for millions of people; second, she provided her husband with a remarkable perspective on what was happening to ordinary Americans during the Great Depression.
THE ROUTLEDGE HISTORICAL ATLAS OF WOMEN IN AMERICA
Looking at general trends and specific items such as life in a tenement, women working overseas in World War I, the production of cosmetics in the 1920s, and new female immigration, THE ROUTLEDGE HISTORICAL ATLAS OF WOMEN IN AMERICA portrays the history of American women from a vivid geographical and demographic perspective. In a variety of colorful maps and charts, the atlas documents milestones in the evolution of the social and political rights of women including the rise of reform movements such as temperance, women’s suffrage, and abolition during the 19th century, and contraception, abortion rights, and the Equal Rights Amendment in the 20th.
Sandra Opdycke is a social historian with a particular interest in women’s history and urban history. Besides the ROUTLEDGE HISTORICAL ATLAS OF WOMEN IN AMERICA, her books include NO ONE WAS TURNED AWAY: THE ROLE OF PUBLIC HOSPITALS IN NEW YORK CITY SINCE 1900, JANE ADDAMS AND HER VISION FOR AMERICA, THE FLU EPIDEMIC OF 1918: AMERICA’S EXPERIENCE IN THE GLOBAL HEALTH CRISIS, and THE WPA: CREATING JOBS AND HOPE IN THE GREAT DEPRESSION. She also serves as an occasional lecturer at the Center for Lifetime Studies, and is currently working on a book about woman suffrage.
Please contact Cliff Laube at (845) 486-7745 with questions about the event.
Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum
Designed by Franklin Roosevelt and dedicated on June 30, 1941, the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum is the nation’s first presidential library and the only one used by a sitting president. Administered by the National Archives and Records Administration since 1941, the Library preserves and makes accessible to the American people the records of FDR’s presidency. The Roosevelt Library’s mission is to foster a deeper understanding of the lives and times of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt and their continuing impact on contemporary life. This work is carried out through the Library’s archives and research room, museum collections and exhibitions, innovative educational programs, and engaging public programming. For more information about the Library or its programs call (800) 337-8474 or visit