WINTER 2016 DOCUMENTARY FILM SERIES: IMMIGRATION, MIGRATION and the AMERICAN DREAM

The Pare Lorentz Center at the FDR Presidential Library announces the
WINTER 2016 DOCUMENTARY FILM SERIES:
IMMIGRATION, MIGRATION and the AMERICAN DREAM
with free screenings of the
Pare Lorentz’s THE PLOW THAT BROKE THE PLAINS (1936),
FARMINGVILLE (2004), THE IMMIGRANT (1917), 
and THE OVERNIGHTERS (2014)
Saturday, February 6, 2016 beginning at 3:00 p.m.
in the Henry A. Wallace Center at the
FDR Presidential Library and Home

 

HYDE PARK, NY — The Pare Lorentz Center at the FDR Presidential Library will present the
WINTER 2016 DOCUMENTARY FILM SERIES: IMMIGRATION, MIGRATION and the AMERICAN DREAM beginning at 3:00 p.m. on Saturday, February 6, 2016. These free screenings will include four films that address the themes of immigration and migration — focused on the plight of the worker — from the Great Depression to present day. Between films,
professor and critic Seth Shire (CUNY) will offer commentary and engage the audience in brief discussion. The program will be held in the Henry A. Wallace Center at the FDR Presidential Library and Home. Seating is first-come, first-served. This event is free and open to the public.

 

Schedule:

 

3:00 p.m.
Pare Lorentz’s THE PLOW THAT BROKE THE PLAINS (1936), 28 minutes, directed by Pare Lorentz, is a treatment of the causes of the Dust Bowl and description of New Deal programs to combat its effects. This film will be paired with a new 7-minute film bio of Pare Lorentz, who was considered FDR’s documentary filmmaker.

 

4:00 p.m.
FARMINGVILLE (2004), 79 minutes, a PBS POINT OF VIEW featured film, is a provocative, complex film about the expanding population of illegal immigrants in a suburban Long Island community and the fallout after two laborers become victims of a hate crime. The story challenges viewers to define “the American dream.”

 

[BREAK FROM 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.]

 

7:00 p.m.
THE IMMIGRANT (1917), 22 minutes, is a silent romantic comedy short featuring Charlie Chaplin. An immigrant coming to the United States is accused of theft on the voyage across the Atlantic Ocean, and falls in love with a beautiful young woman along the way.

 

THE OVERNIGHTERS (2014), 90 minutes, is a Sundance special jury award-winning film, directed by Jesse Moss. This documentary film engages universal societal and economic themes such as: the promise and limits of re-invention, redemption and compassion, as well as the tension between the moral imperative to “love thy neighbor” and the resistance that one small community feels when confronted by a surging river of desperate, job-seeking strangers.

 

Contact Cliff Laube at (845) 486-7745 or email clifford.laube@nara.gov with questions.

 

The Pare Lorentz Center’s mission is to apply the audiovisual techniques pioneered by Pare Lorentz to teach history and social studies, and to perpetuate Lorentz’s use of the documentary format in inspiring social and political messages. Located at the FDR Presidential Library, the center is funded through a generous grant from the New York Community Trust to the Roosevelt Institute. Pare Lorentz created groundbreaking documentary films — a powerful synthesis of stunning imagery, poetic narration, and evocative music — for New Deal agencies of the Roosevelt Administration. The Pare Lorentz Center creates and disseminates educational documentary materials and films to teach the history of the Age of Roosevelt and illustrate the enduring social issues (poverty, social equality and conservation) that President Roosevelt and Pare Lorentz cared so much about. Visit www.parelorentzcenter.org

 for more information.

 

Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum
Designed by Franklin Roosevelt and dedicated on June 30, 1941, the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum is the nation’s first presidential library and the only one used by a sitting president. Every president since FDR has followed his example and established a presidential library administered by the National Archives and Records Administration to preserve and make accessible to the American people the records of their presidencies. The Roosevelt Library’s mission is to foster a deeper understanding of the lives and times of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt and their continuing impact on contemporary life. This work is carried out through the Library’s archives and research room, museum collections and exhibitions, innovative educational programs, and engaging public programming. For more information about the Library or its programs call (800) 337-8474 or visit www.fdrlibrary.marist.edu.