Northern Dutchess Hospital helps adults avert diabetes with free spring program

 

 

Rhinebeck, N.Y. – Northern Dutchess Hospital will once again help adults avert diabetes before the devastating disease takes hold by offering a free, 16-week program this spring.

 

The hospital’s National Prediabetes Prevention Program is for people who are borderline diabetic and want to learn how to maintain weight loss, be more physically active and manage stress.

 

Participants will meet on consecutive Mondays from March 9 to June 26 in the hospital’s cafeteria conference rooms, 6511 Springbrook Ave., Rhinebeck. They can sign up for one of two sessions: at 4:30 or 6 p.m.

 

Photo: From left: National Diabetes Prevention Program lifestyle coaches Roufia Payman and Marie Monroe pose for a portrait with assistant Amanda Sheffield on the Northern Dutchess Hospital campus in Rhinebeck. (credit: courtesy photo)

Photo: From left: National Diabetes Prevention Program lifestyle coaches Roufia Payman and Marie Monroe pose for a portrait with assistant Amanda Sheffield on the Northern Dutchess Hospital campus in Rhinebeck.

The curriculum, led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is based on research that showed that losing a modest amount of weight (5 to 7 pounds) and increasing physical activity prevented or delayed type 2 diabetes by 58 percent in people with prediabetes.

 

“It’s mind-blowing that one in three American adults has prediabetes, but most don’t know it,” said Roufia Payman, outpatient nutrition education supervisor at Northern Dutchess and diabetes program lifestyle coach. “These are people who could make small changes in their lives and prevent big health problems down the road.”

 

“Diabetes is an epidemic in this country caused primarily because of obesity and inactivity,” said Northern Dutchess exercise specialist Marie Monroe, also a lifestyle coach. “This program exists because diabetes is a preventable disease and we can help.”

 

Risk factors include: a family history with diabetes, prior gestational diabetes, being overweight, little to no exercise, and older age.

 

To find out if you qualify for the program, contact Amanda Sheffield at Northern Dutchess Hospital, asheffie@Health-quest.org or 845-871-4380. Space is limited.

 

For more information, visit www.health-quest.org/ndhdiabetes

 

At a glance

Facts about diabetes and its personal and financial costs:

The number of Americans with diabetes has more than tripled in the past two decades.

  • An estimated 1 in 9 adults aged 20 and older has diabetes. The CDC estimates that if trends continue, as many as 1 in 3 adults could have diabetes by 2050.
  • Medical costs for people with diabetes are 2.3 times higher than for people without the disease.
  • Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure, amputation of feet and legs not related to an injury, and new cases of blindness among adults in the United States.
  • One out of every five healthcare dollars is spent caring for someone diagnosed with diabetes. Nationwide implementation of the prevention program could save the U.S. healthcare system $5.7 billion and prevent about 885,000 cases of type 2 diabetes within 25 years, according to CDC research.
  • Dutchess County had the highest 2009 adult diabetes diagnosis rate compared to the other mid-Hudson Valley counties and the statewide average, according to the New York state Department of Health:https://www.health.ny.gov/statistics/prevention/obesity/county/dutchess.htm